How To Deal With Your Boss When You’re Completely Over It

Filed in Educational Tips by on July 21, 2022 0 Comments

Don’t bite the hand that feeds you: If you’ve ever worked in an office, or had a boss, then you know how much of a nightmare it can be.

The crucial dynamic between employees and managers is often fraught with tension and stress.

After all, your manager is essentially the person who controls whether you stay employed or lose your job.

But it’s not all bad news — working for a boss also has its perks, too.

Bosses can also be useful references in the future when you apply for other jobs.

Read on: Five Reasons Why You Need a Canned Food Continuous Sterilizer

Don’t bite the hand that feeds you

So now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, let’s get back to the nitty-gritty of being over your boss.

Working with someone who makes your blood boil on a daily basis is no easy feat — especially if they are your superior.

Bosses can make life extremely difficult for workers, but not impossible.

Here are some things to keep in mind when dealing with your boss so that neither of you end up losing it completely:

How To Deal With Your Boss When You’re Completely Over It

 

Working for an awful boss can feel like an endless cycle of stress, humiliation and general misery. It’s not uncommon to find yourself completely over your boss and the job you once loved so much — especially in industries that are known for toxic work cultures and even toxic bosses.

In fact, working for a terrible manager is one of the top reasons people quit their job, according to the human resources solutions firm UHR. The good news?

You don’t have to stay stuck in this cycle forever. There are ways to get through it and move on from the nightmare that is your current boss.

If you’re reading this because you need help getting through a terrible boss and are looking for some sort of light at the end of this dark tunnel, read on for some advice on how to deal with a terrible boss when you’re completely over it!

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Communicate your feelings to your boss directly.

Don’t bite the hand that feeds you: Sometimes, you just need to let your boss know that you’re sick and tired of the way they treat you and the rest of the team. Communicating this to your boss directly is the only way to get them to take note and change their ways — or, hopefully, get them fired if they’re incredibly toxic and unresponsive to feedback. Make sure to communicate your feelings only when you’re feeling calm, though, and be as specific as possible with your complaints. For example, instead of saying, “You’re such a terrible boss,” try saying something like, “After reviewing your feedback, I felt like you unfairly criticized my work.”

Find a coworker you can commiserate with.

Sometimes, the only thing that can make you feel better about your awful boss is being able to share your feelings with someone who understands. If you work with someone who is also sick and tired of dealing with your terrible boss, you can find solace in each other — and maybe even make a plan to quit together. If you don’t work with anyone who is also fed up, however, you may want to try finding a coworker outside of your department that you can connect with. For example, if you work in accounting and you’re dealing with a terrible sales manager, you may want to start making friends with the people in marketing, who might be dealing with the same issues. Finding someone who can relate to your situation and help you get through it will make the situation a lot more bearable.

Set some clear boundaries with your boss.

If you’ve tried communicating your feelings to your boss and nothing has changed, you may want to set some clear boundaries with them. For example, you may want to tell your boss not to contact you outside of work hours unless it’s an emergency or something that requires your attention. While this may not make you friends with your boss, it could help them realize that you don’t have to be their punching bag and that you’re not interested in being abused by them. It might also help you feel less stressed out if your boss stops asking you so many questions outside of work hours.

Collect evidence of the things that bother you most.

Don’t bite the hand that feeds you: If you’ve tried all of the above and you’re still completely over your terrible boss, you may want to start collecting evidence of the things that bother you most. For example, if your boss is constantly interrupting you in meetings or giving you unfair criticism, you may want to start keeping track of these things so you can show your boss how they’re affecting your work and making you feel. You can either jot down notes during the meeting or keep a record of them after the meeting concludes. You can also collect evidence of other issues that are taking a toll on your mental health, like your boss’s tendency to gossip or show favouritism, their unprofessionalism, or the way they treat their employees.

Request a meeting to have an open and honest discussion.

If you’ve tried everything else on this list and things are still unbearable at work, you may want to request a meeting with your boss and tell them that you’re completely over the way they manage the team. Let them know that you want to have an open, honest discussion about the way you both feel. It may not be the most comfortable conversation, but it’s the only way to get your boss to understand that you’re done with their nonsense and you want to move on from this awful work environment.

If that doesn’t work, it’s time to start looking for another job.

Don’t bite the hand that feeds you: If your boss is completely over you, you may want to start looking for another job. This may seem like a defeat, but it’s actually a way to take control of the situation and move on from a terrible work environment. Plus, it’s good to keep in mind that you can always come back to the job market when your boss gets fired or retires — or you can even try to get your boss fired if you feel like you have the evidence to back up your claims! Working for a terrible boss can feel like an endless cycle of stress, humiliation, and general misery. It’s not uncommon to find yourself completely over your boss and the job you once loved so much — especially in industries that are known for toxic work cultures and even toxic bosses. In fact, working for a terrible manager is one of the top reasons people quit their job, according to the human resources solutions firm UHR. Luckily, there are ways to get through it and move on from the nightmare that is your current boss.

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